Monday, May 11, 2020

STUDY EFFECTIVELY

HOW TO STUDY EFFECTIVELY
 Preparing to Study

Manage your time. Make a weekly schedule and devote a certain amount of time per day to studying. This will also improve your grades. That amount will vary depending on whether you're in high school or college, and also varies by field of study. Make sure you stick to your schedule as much as possible but don't be afraid to go off of plan sometimes to study more for the most recent upcoming exam. Make sure this study plan is realistic and not impossible. Don't forget to schedule in everything, from eating, dressing, and commuting, to labs and scheduled classes.

You need to balance school, work, and extracurricular activities. If you are really struggling with your classes, you may want to give up the after school job or an extracurricular activity until your grades come up. You need to prioritize your time. Remember: your education is the most important thing because it is the foundation of your future success. 
For college classes, you should base the hours you study per class on how difficult the class is and how many credit hours the class is worth. For example, if you have a 3-hour physics class that is really hard, you want to study 9 hours a week (3 hrs x 3 for hard difficulty). If you have a literature course that is worth 3 hours and is kind of hard, you may want to study 6 hours a week (3 hrs x 2 for medium difficulty).

Pace yourself. Find the best speed for you to study and adjust accordingly. Some concepts or classes will come to you more naturally, so you can study those more quickly. Other things may take you twice as long. Take the time you need and study at the pace you feel comfortable.
If you study more slowly, remember that you will need more time to study
Get enough sleep. Make enough time in your schedule to get enough sleep. Get a good night's sleep every night and you'll be making the best of your study time. This is important as you lead up to the test, and especially important right before you take the test. Studies have shown that sleep positively impacts test taking by improving memory and attentiveness. Staying up all night studying may sound like a good idea, but skip the all-night cram session. If you study throughout the weeks, you won't need to cram anyway. Getting a good night's sleep will help you perform better.

If you end up a little sleep deprived despite your best efforts, take a short nap before studying. Limit your nap to 15-30 minutes. After you wake up, do some physical activity (like you would do during a break) right before you start.
Clear your mind of anything that doesn't have to do with the topic you're studying. If you’ve got a lot on your mind, take a moment to write yourself some notes about what you're thinking about and how you feel before you start studying. This will help to clear your mind and focus all your thoughts on your work

Eliminate electronic distractions. One of the worst distractions for studying is electronic devices. They are hooked up to social media, you receive texts through your phone, and your laptop is hooked to the internet. Silence your cell phone or keep it in your bag so it's not there to distract you if someone calls or texts you. If you can, don't open your laptop or connect it to the internet.
If you are easily distracted by social networking sites such as YouTube, Facebook, or others, download one of the available applications to instantly block some of the distracting sites on your computer. When you are done with your work, you can unblock access to all the sites as before.

Setting Up Your Study Space

Find a good study spot. Gain control of your study space. You should feel comfortable in order that studying is more enjoyable. If you hate sitting at a table within the library, then find somewhere far more pleasant, like your sofa or a beanbag chair on your floor. Try studying in comfortable clothes. The place where you study should be free from distractions and comparatively quiet.
Don't choose an area so comfortable that you simply risk falling asleep. You want to be comfortable, not able to nod off . A bed isn't a really good study spot when you're tired.

Traffic outside your window and quiet library conversations are fine noise , but interrupting siblings and music blasting within the next room aren't . You may want to travel somewhere faraway from people that may provide distractions.
Choose background music carefully. Some people prefer silence while they study, others prefer music within the background. Music are often beneficial to your studying by helping you be calm, elevating your mood, and motivating you. If you hear music, stick with music , which is music that has no words like classical, movie scores, trance, or baroque.

If it doesn't distract you, hear familiar music with words. Get off anything that distracts you. You may be ready to hear rock 'n' roll with words but not pop. Figure out what works for you.

Make sure to keep the music at a moderate to low volume. Loud music can distract you while quiet music can assist you while studying.

Skip the radio. The commercials and the DJ's voice can bring you out of your study zone.TVs can also distract you, so turn them off.

Listen to background sounds. Background sounds can assist you "get within the zone" and specialize in your studies without getting distracted. Natural sounds like waterfalls, rain, thunder, and jungle sounds can give enough noise to stay you focused and block out other sounds. There are many places online to seek out these sorts of sounds, including YouTube.

Keep the television turned off. Having the television on while you study is a bad idea. Voices are extremely distracting because it engages the language center of your brain.

Snack smart. Eat healthy, nutritional foods while you study rather than foods crammed with sugar and fat. Go for energy boosting foods, like fruit, or foods to make you feel full, like vegetables and nuts. If you need something sweet, eat dark chocolate. Drink water to keep you hydrated, and drink tea if you need a caffeine boost.

Avoid foods with high amounts of sugar and carbs, like instant noodles, chips, and candy. Don't drink energy drinks and sugary sodas; they contain high amounts of sugar which can cause you to crash. If you drink coffee, avoid sugar heavy drinks.


Have your snacks prepared once you begin a study session so you do not get hungry and go rummaging for food.

Using Effective Study Techniques

Use a study method that involves active reading to assist you comprehend and begin learning the fabric . The method gets you to preview the fabric and actively read so you're more prepared once you read a chapter or article.

Start with Survey, which suggests to look around the chapter to seem for tables, figures, headings, and any bolded words.

Then Question by making each heading into an issue .
Read the chapter while trying to answer the questions you made up of the section headings.
Recite the answers to the questions verbally and any important information you remember from the chapter.

Review the chapter to form sure you include all the most ideas. Then think about why this is important.

Use the THIEVES strategy. When you are starting to study a replacement chapter, it'll make the knowledge it contains far more meaningful and easier to find out if you preview the chapter using THIEVES.

Start with the title. What does the topic title tell you about the selection/article/chapter? What do you already know about the topic? What should you think about while reading? This will help you frame your reading.

Scan the "headings" and subheadings. What do these headings and subheadings tell you about what you will be reading? Turn each heading and subheading into an issue to assist guide your reading.

Move to the introduction. What does the introduction tell you ?
Read the first sentence of every paragraph. These are generally topic sentences and assist you believe what the paragraphs are going to be about.

Look at the visuals and vocabulary. This includes tables, graphs, and charts. More importantly, look at the bolded, italicized, and underlined words, words or paragraphs of a different color, and numerical lists.

Read the end of chapter questions. What concepts do you have to know by the time you finish reading the chapter? Keep these questions in mind as you read.
Look at the chapter summary to urge an honest idea of what the chapter is about before happening to read the chapter as an entire .

Highlight important details. Use a highlighter or underline the foremost details within the body of the text, in order that you'll spot them more easily once you review the fabric .Don't highlight everything - that defeats the purpose. Instead, only highlight the foremost important phrases and words. It also helps to form notes in pencil within the margin in your own words to summarize or discuss details .

You can also read just these portions so as to quickly review the fabric you've got learned while it's still fresh in your memory, and help the most points to sink in.

If the textbook belongs to the varsity , then you'll use highlighted sticky notes, or a daily sticky note beside the sentence or paragraph. fix your notes on a sticky note and paste it beside the paragraph.

It's also an honest thanks to periodically review during this manner to stay the most points of what you've got already learned fresh in your mind if you would like to remember an outsized amount of fabric for a extended period, like for a final exam , for a comprehensive exam in your major, for a graduate oral, or for entry into a profession.

Summarize or outline the material. One great way to review is to write down the fabric in your notes and within the textbook in your own words. That way you'll believe it in your own terms rather than textbook language. Incorporate your summaries into your notes, if there's a connection. You can also make an outline. Organize it by main ideas and only the foremost important subpoints.

If you've got enough privacy, it also helps to recite your summaries aloud so as to involve more senses. If you're an aural learner, or learn better when verbalizing it, then this method could assist you .

If you're having trouble summarizing the fabric in order that it sticks in your head, try teaching it to somebody else . Pretend you're teaching it to someone who doesn't know anything about the subject .


When making summaries, use different colors. The brain remembers information more easily when it's associated

No comments:

Post a Comment